Press Information

MHI Employees Teach a Science Class in Hiroshima about Airplanes, Using Paper Models of the Boeing 787

Print

On November 19 and 20, MHI Group employees conducted a science class about airplanes for 134 sixth graders of the Minami-konan Elementary School in Hiroshima. The class was taught using paper models of the Boeing 787.

The proceedings began with a simple introduction of the operations carried out at the nearby Hiroshima Machinery Works. The students were informed that the theme of the day's class, airplanes, was chosen because building airplanes is one of the tasks performed at the Hiroshima plant. The class-dealing specifically with learning why an airplane is able to fly-then got underway in cooperation with staff from DIRECTFORCE, a general incorporated association based in Tokyo.

To begin, the students set to making paper models of the Boeing 787 under the guidance of the day's instructors. They then tried flying their airplanes for the first time. Next, they were given a talk on the history and structure of aircraft. After that, they deepened their understanding by experiencing, each in turn, how wind power-air currents-works, using the air blown from a hair dryer. Equipped with this knowledge, the students then made improvements to their airplanes and flew them for a second time. This time, the planes were more stable and flew farther than before, arousing great surprise and joy in the students at discovering how even a small improvement produced big changes. Finally, the students divided into teams and took part in a contest to see whose airplane could fly the farthest. Some students' planes were even able to fly the entire width of their gymnasium, causing great excitement.

After the class, the students told of their impressions of the day's experience. "I never knew before how many different products MHI makes," commented one. "I learned what makes an airplane able to fly," enthused another. A third said the hair dryer experiment really enabled her to get a good understanding of wind power.

Going forward, MHI Group will continue to convey the fun of science (and science classes!) to children through monozukuri-the traditional Japanese concept of craftsmanship-as our way of developing the next generation and contributing to our local communities.

Related news:

Learning about the Hiroshima Machinery Works' operations
Learning about the Hiroshima Machinery Works' operations
Making model airplanes from patterns printed on paper
Making model airplanes from patterns printed on paper
Feeling the air current from a hair dryer
Feeling the air current from a hair dryer
The airplane flying contest
The airplane flying contest